Tag: fire

How To Make Your Fire Pit Last Longer

It is feeling a lot chillier than we’d expect for this time of year. Most of us have spent time getting our gardens ready to enjoy the sunshine, but the weather has other ideas! You can still make the most of your outdoor space if you have a fire pit or chiminea to keep you warm. And with the help of Firemizer, it will burn for much longer into the evening.

Fire pit

Whether you are entertaining or enjoying your fire pit alone, the last thing you want is for your fire to be going out every few minutes. First, you need to get your fire lit. Place scrunched up newspaper at the bottom of your pit and then place kindling (small dry sticks) on top. Carefully light the newspaper and kindling with a long match. An even easier way to light your fire is with Firebuilder, our handy firelighter and kindling in one!

Now you are ready to add your wood. There are certain types of wood that are less likely to spit or smoke too much. We recommend ash, oak or hawthorn for a steady, long-lasting burn. These are dense woods which will produce less smoke and residue. It is very important to only burn dry wood. Damp wood smokes heavily producing far more particulate emissions, making it worse for the environment.

Above all of this, the best way to burn for longer, reduce emissions and also save on fuel is by using Firemizer! Simply place at the bottom of your fire before you add your fire lighter and kindling and just sit back and enjoy the benefits.

Our Firemizer and Firebuilder Starter Pack is also available on our website.

Save On Gas, Cook Your Pancakes Over The Fire!

With Shrove Tuesday just days away, now is the time to starting stocking up on your ingredients to make the perfect pancakes! Why not save on gas and cook your pancakes over your fire this year, it’s really simple to do and fun too!

Mixture recipe

  • 100g plain flour
  • 2 large eggs
  • 300ml milk
  • tbsp vegetable oil for cooking

Vegan option

  • 300g self-raising flour
  • tsp baking powder
  • tbsp sugar (any kind)
  • tbsp vanilla extract
  • 400ml plant-based milk (such as oat, almond or soya)
  • tbsp vegetable oil for cooking

Method

Firstly, place all the ingredients into a bowl or large jug, then whisk to a smooth batter. For best results set aside for 30 minutes to rest, if you don’t have time, you can start cooking straight away. Next, you need to heat a non-stick frying pan over the fire before pouring in your oil. Once nicely heated, pour the batter mix into the pan and spread the batter thinly around the pan. Finally, the fun bit! Flip the pancakes once cooked on one side and leave for another minute on the other, then serve!

Toppings

Although traditional toppings like syrup and Nutella are delicious! Why not try something different, like…

  • Jam and cream
  • Yoghurt and nectarine
  • Peanut butter and banana
  • Fruit and ice cream
  • Bacon

Top tip: don’t forget to use Firemizer under your charcoal or wood as this will give you an even burn which helps cook over a fire!

Easy To Make Chocolate Yule Log!

The yule log has been a Christmas tradition since way before the medieval times. Originating in Norway, a giant log would be hoisted onto the hearth to celebrate the return of the sun each year. A simple ritual would be held by having each family member write down wishes, place them on the log and burn them on the fireplace. What a wonderful tradition to have, I personally would love to begin this tradition with my own family, why don’t you give it a go too?! (Don’t forget your Firemizer)

In the 19th century the chocolate log was invented in France, a rolled chocolate sponge cake to resemble a miniature actual yule log. Here we have an easy to follow recipe to make this delicious Christmas treat for you to enjoy.

Ingredients

For the sponge
  • 5 eggs
  • 100g plain flour
  • 50g cocoa powder
  • 100g caster sugar
For the topping
  • 300ml double cream
  • 300g dark chocolate
For the filling
  • 300ml double cream, whipped

Method

For the sponge
  1. Preheat your oven to 180C. Grease and then line the base and sides of a 30 x 35cm Swiss roll tin with baking parchment.
  2. Separate your eggs, and put into large mixing bowls. Add the sugar and 2 tbsp of water to the egg yolks. Using an electric whisk or mixer, whisk the sugar and yolks for around 5 minutes until the mixture is light in colour and thick enough to leave a trail when the whisk blades are lifted. Sift in the flour and cocoa, then fold in lightly, using a large metal spoon.
  3. Next beat the egg whites until stiff, then fold into the cake mixture in three batches, using the blades to preserve as much air as possible.
  4. Pour the mixture into your tin, carefully spreading to the edges. Bake for 10-12 minutes, or until the cake feels firm to the touch.
  5. Place a large piece of baking parchment onto your work surface and sprinkle lightly with caster sugar. Turn the cake out onto the parchment and peel off the lining paper. Cover with a clean tea towel, then leave to cool completely.
  6. Then score along the edge of one of the long sides of the cake and roll up from there, using the paper to help you, rolling the paper inside the cake.
For the topping
  1. Heat the cream in a pan then remove from the heat and add the chocolate, stirring until it is melted. Cool to room temperature, then put into the fridge to firm up.

  2. Unroll the cold Swiss roll and remove the paper. Spread the whipped cream on top, and re-roll tightly.

  3. Put the chocolate icing into a piping bag fitted with a star nozzle. Pipe long thick lines along the cake, covering the cake completely so it looks like the bark of a tree. Alternatively, just use a palette knife to spread on the icing and create rough bark texture with a fork.

  4. Finish with a dusting of icing sugar and add your chosen decorations. Tip: sprinkle with edible glitter to make it look extra special!

 

How To Cook Bread Over Your Firepit

Cooking bread over a firepit couldn’t be simpler. The summer holidays are in full swing and you might be running out of fun things to do to keep the kids entertained. Fire building and cooking is without a doubt a favourite with both adults and children alike. You can cook just about anything over an open fire, but some of the best recipes are the simplest. Trust us when we say that freshly baked bread smells even better on a campfire!

You could start your activity by going on a stick hunt. The best sticks should be long enough so that you can hold them at a comfortable distance from the fire and around 1.5cm. Freshly cut greenwood is good, because of its moisture it won’t burn so easily.

How to cook bread on a stick over your firepit

Ingredients
  • Plain flour 150g
  • Salt a pinch
  • Olive oil 1 tbsp
  • Cold water
  • Sticks

Method

  1. In a large bowl mix the flour and salt together. Add the oil and a few splashes of water, then bring the mix together with your hands.
  2. A little at a time add water to form a dough. If you add too much water, don’t worry, just add a little more flour.
  3. Split the dough into quarters and roll it between your palms to form a long sausage shape.
  4. Wrap the rolled dough around your stick; make sure your stick is long enough to keep your hands from getting too close to the fire.
  5. Hold your dough over you firepit, turning the stick until the bread turns golden brown on all sides.

Tip: add butter, jam or even Nutella for an extra special treat!

Remember with open fires and children, you have to be extra careful. Never leave your children unaccompanied by your firepit.

Don’t forget to use firemizer under your charcoal or wood as this will help even out heat giving you an even burn which helps cook over a fire!

Why Firepits Are Good For You

Firepits don’t just bring you warmth, they have lots of other advantages too. As well as being practical they can bring you health and emotional benefits too. Here’s just a few reasons why firepits are good for you…

Help you to relax and unwind

After a busy or stressful day can you think of anything better than sitting by an open outdoor fire? Scientists have found that an open fire reduces blood pressure. Subsequently the longer people sit in front of a roaring fire, the greater the relaxing effect it has on them.

You can use them all year round

Using a firepit enables you to enjoy outdoor living all year round. As a matter of fact there is no reason why you can’t throw an outdoor party, even in the middle of winter! Undoubtedly a burning fire is sure to keep your guests warm on a cold evening. In fact, why not get out the marshmallows for a delicious s’mores treat for everyone to enjoy.

It lights up the night

No outdoor lighting can compete with the blaze of a real fire. Firepits provide an ambient glow to your evening long after the sun has gone down. Make the most of your garden sat in the warmth and comfort of your open outside fire gazing at the stars.

Creates a romantic atmosphere

While firepits great for gatherings, they also set the scene for a romantic evening for two. No need to go ‘out out’, as an alternative share a bottle of wine and gaze at the twinkling sky snuggled up with your loved one.

You can use it to cook

Cooking is simple using your firepit. All you need is a grill rack, a couple of pots and some tin foil. Classics such as hot dogs, burgers and kebabs are always delicious. Try wrapping potatoes in foil and tucking them amongst the coals for perfect jacket potatoes!

 

Now you know why fire pits are good for you, keep your fire burning even longer into the night by adding Firemizer. Click here to order yours.

 

Can you make pancakes over a fire?

With pancake day only 3 days away the most important question is can you make pancakes over a fire?

The answer is a firm yes, so if you’re out camping and want some pancakes or fancy making over your fire at home here is how.

Mixture recipe

  • 1/2 cup of self-raising flour
  • 1 teaspoon of baking powder
  • a pinch of salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 2/3 cup of milk

Vegan option

    •   300g self-raising flour
    •   A teaspoon baking powder
    •   1 tbsp sugar
    •   1 tbsp vanilla extract
    •   400ml plant-based milk (oat, almond, soya, coconut)
    •   vegetable oil for cooking

All you need to cook is warmth from the fire and hot flat surface to cook on

Don’t cook in the flames but use the hot embers, charcoal is an easier option as it’s easier to get the hot embers stage and you use less fuel. However wood will work just fine!

Cooking surface

Cast iron cookware is the best and a crepe pan is a top choice as they are very flat and large.

You can use a cast iron griddle which has slightly higher sides but other than that there isn’t much difference.

Method

  1. When the embers are hot place your pan onto the embers and pour a little bit of oil.
  2. Once spread and the oil is warm pour on pancake batter
  3. The proper way to tell when a pancake needs turning is when the bubbles in the top burst.

Toppings

  • Orange and sugar
  • Lemon and sugar
  • Banana and Nutella

Top tip: don’t forget to use firemizer under your charcoal or wood as this will help even out heat giving you an even burn which helps cook over a fire!

What drinks can you make over a campfire?

What better way to make the most of your campfire than bringing some home comforts to the outdoors! 

Traditional Campfire Coffee Recipe

  • First, place six teaspoons of ground coffee into the camping coffee pot and then pour three pints of cold water over the coffee grounds.
  • Place the coffee pot on the fire and bring to a boil.
  • Once boiled, take the pot off the heat and allow it too steep for approximately three minutes.
  • To make the coffee more delicious, try adding three or four spoons of cold water to the liquid after steeping to settle the coffee grounds.

smoreThe Campfire Percolator Coffee Pot

This campfire coffee recipe is the most common method for making campfire coffee.

  • Add one to two tablespoons of coarsely ground coffee for every six ounces of water.
  • To avoid having coffee grounds in your mixture, it is recommended that you poke a hole in the coffee filter and place it in the perk basket.
  • Watch the percolator until the mixture turns a coffee color because the longer the coffee percolates, the stronger it will become.

Campfire hot chocolate

  • Mix the dry ingredients at home, Cocoa powder, sugar, cinnamon, and salt.
  • Heat milk in a camp coffee pot or saucepan over low heat. 
  • As the milk begins to heat add 2 tablespoons of the cocoa mix to the bottom of your mug.
  • Then top with 1 cup of warmed milk and stir until combined.
  • Why not add some toasted marshmallows into your hot chocolate

Cooking Tip: Using whole milk for this recipe will make it nice and creamy. Or you can use an alternative milk option like soya milk or coconut milk, it’s perfect with hot chocolate.

Cooking Tip: Don’t scald the milk, heat it slowly

cooking tip: Don’t forget to use Firemizer on your campfire. this will help distribute the heat for an even burn.

Campfire Cocktail

ingredients

  • Bulleit bourbon
  • Malt whiskey
  • Marshmallow syrup
  • Caster sugar
  • Mini marshmallows
  • To make the syrup, boil the marshmallows with 500ml water. Once they have dissolved, add the sugar and stir to dissolve this until fully combined. 
  • Stir all ingredients over ice and serve with a toasted marshmallow (optional).

5 Reasons Wood Burners Are Good For You

As people are becoming more aware of pollution wood burners are getting a lot of heat [pun not intended] from the media and activist groups. However, there are benefits to wood burners and ways to decrease any potentially harmful particulates.

Drying the air

Wood burners are very good at drying out damp environments which will make your home more pleasant and breathable. By keeping the air in your home free from moisture will prevent mold from forming which could lead to health problems.

Repelling allergens

Log fireplaces can help reduce the number of allergens in the air. These can get caught in the updraft of hot air from the fire. This will carry them out through the chimney or flue.

Providing relaxation

When it is cold and miserable outside there’s nothing better than sitting by a warm fire. A wood burner can really make a house feel more homely. You can also use your fire to cook on adding another element to your wood burner.

Cut down on heating bills

As heating bills rise more people find it hard to heat their homes. Having a wood burner can be very economical by saving you money on your heating bills. While you may have to still use your heating in other rooms having the option to lessen your heating bill while keeping warm is a win-win.

Good for the environment

Wood is carbon-neutral fuel, the amount of carbon dioxide given off when burnt is equal to the amount consumed by other trees which absorbs the carbon dioxide and releases oxygen.

There are other alternative fuels like coffee logs that are made from used coffee beans. Both wood and coffee logs work well with firemizer which will reduce your fuel consumption, reduce particulates and creosote in your flue.

How To Start Cooking Over Your Fireplace

To get the most out of your fire this winter why not try cooking with your fireplace!

A wood-burning fireplace is safe for you to cook in, however, a gas fireplace is not. For a gas fireplace, the logs need to be clean and unobstructed to work properly. Grease or food could fall onto the logs and could potentially cause a fire hazard.

Safety for indoor cooking
  • it is important to have the flue open when you start cooking on your fireplace. Leaving the flue closed will allow a build-up of carbon monoxide which is very dangerous.
  • Keep flammable items away from the fireplace as you’ll be interacting with the fire while cooking.
  • Make sure your fireplace is clean and maintained as cooking in an unclean fireplace can cause smoke risks.

You can cook over a wide temperature from 160 degrees for slow roasting to over 750 degrees for high heat grilling.

Cooking options

Cooking straight onto the embers. You can cook whole onions, eggplant, peppers, yams, potatoes and thick steak-like porterhouse, t-bone or ribeye.

  • arrange two parallel rows of firebricks, broadsides down toward the front of the fireplace, shovel a layer of ember between the two rows, then rest a frying pan, griddle or dutch oven on the bricks. The wood smoke will still infuse the food with a smoke flavour if it is in a pan.
Skewers

sausages or kebabs with metal skewers, don’t forget you can cook s’mores this way too!

Dutch oven

You can easily cook soups or stews on your fireplace. The trick is to get your fireplace going that it produces plenty of hot embers. Then you can place the dutch oven on the embers. Remember to rotate to distribute the heat evenly.

A String

This is still used in southern France, a method called la ficelle (on a string). Meat or poultry is put into a compact packaged and suspended from a hook in the ceiling or mantelpiece. The meat rotates near the heat from the fire.

Tips for cooking with your wood fireplace
  • avoid overly fatty foods like rib-eye steak as they will create a lot of smoke when cooking over the fire.
  • Choose the right wood, well-seasoned woods like applewood will give you a unique flavour that you won’t get from an oven. This is also less likely to give off dangerous sparks.
  • Avoid pine or cedarwood, they burn at low temperatures and can leave resin in your chimney. Don’t use regular logs that may include petroleum wax as these are dangerous to ingest.
  • Test the temperature, the heat distributes unevenly – to prevent this use Firemizer and will allow for an even burn.
  • Place a pan to catch drips

How To Look After Your Wood Burner?

As you’ve probably been getting the most out of your fire this winter, to maximize its efficiency you have to look after your wood burner.

Here are some things to look out for and do to keep your fire going for many winters!

coalCleaning

Giving your fire a thorough clean can be just the thing it needs to bring it back to life. It is also important to get your chimney swept at least once a year as they can tell you about any damage. You should also clean the glass, most modern stoves are fitted with airways systems to keep the glass clean. If yours does not then you can use newspaper dipped in malt vinegar or use wood ash. Don’t use any abrasive materials to clean the glass as this could cause permanent damage.

Check for rust

This may not be a problem for a modern stove however it worth saying. If you do spot any rust you can rub the area with wire wool and then reapply stove paint to get it looking as good as new.

Empty the ash pan

When the hot ashes start to pile up they can come into contact with the lower side of the grate and the heat from the ashes could cause it to become distorted and lose shape.

Clean the baffle/ throat plate

This area on and around the baffle plate is the top spot for soot to gather. This makes your stove less efficient by blocking the flue it also could be dangerous. Clean this once a week depending on how often you use your stove.

Leave the door ajar

When the stove isn’t being used it is best to leave the door slightly open. This allows a flow of air through the system which can help stop corrosion.

Use Firemizer

Using this in your wood, coal or multi-fuel stove can help reduce creosote and harmful particulates. As well as reducing your ash content and reducing the number of times you have to empty the ash pan.

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